In Memoriam: The Columbia STS-107

 

444px-STS-107_Flight_Insignia.svg

The STS-107 Patch

 

On February 1, 2003 (13 years ago Monday), the space shuttle Columbia  mission STS-107, disintegrated in the atmosphere over Texas and Lousiana.  Seven people died, and it caused a two year downtime for the Shuttle program while ships were reassessed and refitted to be safer; similar to what happened after the fire on Apollo 1.

This one is probably more in everyone’s mind as it was more recent.  I remember recording news broadcasts because I wanted to be able to watch it later when I had time to take in everything.  (I never did…I actually don’t know where those tapes are. )

The shuttle had a piece of foam fly off during lift off, allowing heat and gasses to enter the ship during re-entry and destabilize it.  The crew, which included non-American members, was incapacitated nearly instantly (all links are Wiki):

After the two years of investigation and review, many new safety protocols were put into place, including procedures on how to repair foam displacement while in orbit.  However, it brought up the idea that the Shuttles were getting too old.

The Shuttle program ended in 2011, four years ago this July after 135 missions and 30 years. It had started in April 1981 with the launch of Columbia which completed successfully 27 of its 28 missions. The remaining shuttles were sent to various locations for storage and archival, and NASA’s space program began focus is on their next project: The Orion spacecraft.

For More Information:

Wikipedia: Space Shuttle Columbia Disaster , The Space Shuttle Columbia

Space.Com: Columbia Disaster:  What NASA Learned

TheAtlantic: The History of the Space Shuttle

NASA: Orion & Columbia

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s